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National Stalking Awareness Week

This week 24th – 28th April is National Stalking Awareness Week. According to a 2006 survey (British Crime Survey) at least 5 million people are stalked each year, but this is likely to be a much higher figure as only 1% of stalking cases are recorded by police (National Stalking Consortium, 2016).

National Stalking Advocacy Service, Paladin, discovered during its 2016 service evaluation that 70% of its clients were female, and 68% of cases were related to domestic violence. You First is the YOU Domestic Violence and Abuse service supporting people daily who are experiencing the realities of stalking. Following on from partnership work with the Police and Crime Commissioner in Dorset, You First are pleased to announce they were successful in the application for a share in the Tampon Tax. They have received funding to further develop and deliver an innovative and specialist service for those experiencing stalking.

The service will be targeted specifically at people who are either engaged with, or experiencing stalking across all different types of stalking and involves working in close partnership with the police, probation, health and other specialist support.

Paladin are hosting a national stalking conference in June. YOU’s Head of Domestic Violence and Abuse, and Manager of Dorset You First will both be attending in order to help form best practice at the new clinic. Statistics from crime surveys reveal that most people don’t report stalking incidents to the police and are not sure how to get help. We’re excited to be part of the wider conversation providing solutions to this crime affecting so many peoples’ lives in secret.

Follow National Stalking Awareness Week on social media through the hashtag #StalkingMatters or #NSWA17

What is Stalking?

Defined by the Suzy Lamplugh Trust:

‘It is hard to give an exact definition of stalking because stalkers will often use multiple and differing methods to harass their victims. Stalking can consist of any type of behaviour such as regularly sending flowers or gifts, making unwanted or malicious communication, damaging property and physical or sexual assault. If the behaviour is persistent and clearly unwanted, causing you fear, distress or anxiety then it is stalking and you should not have to live with it.’¬†